Naturally, Kansas is a good place for the teacher exodus to really hit hard first

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/kansas-teacher-shortage_55b913ebe4b0074ba5a729d5?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592

We are still about 3 years from the start of the massive final baby boomer retirement that is going to really hit teaching hard.  Kansas, which managed to flip the bird to teachers by keeping their pay low and removing tenure (and thanks to a Republican experiment in economics that is blowing up badly, under-funding education even after the state supreme court demanded increases to the finding).  Did I mention that Kansas just passed a law that makes it a jailable crime for a teacher to teach anything considered offensive? (which, as you might guess, is left rather ambiguous in the statute) … is perhaps now reaping the real fruits of their labors.  In creating a philosophically conservative cocoon that punishes everyone and rewards no one, the exodus is in full swing.  Some numbers:

* 2014-15 Kansas retirees: 2326 (an 84% increase from 2011-12)

* Teachers who left the profession: 740 (51% increase from 2011-12)

* Teachers who remained in the profession, but left Kansas: 654 (a 64% increase from 2011-12)

Kansas, probably along with Louisiana and Mississippi are considered the worst states to teach in, but sadly instead of other states realizing this and trying to become the opposite of this, there seems to be an odd trend of trying to be more like them.  Even places like New York seems to be trying really hard to be the Northeast Mississippi.  Naturally Kansas would see the effects of the recent trends in the profession first.  In the end, every state is going to get hit by this because it is far too late to mitigate the effects, which require years to change because of enticing students to get trained as teachers, and then get them through college and into the profession.  Private and charter schools will not be exempt from this because, as few people seem to realize, there are no special teacher pools fro charter and private schools.  What you can hope is that your state can make changes to how they approach students and teachers and maybe siphon in some of the talent from other states.

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